Exhibition

Matt Hoyt: One Another

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Matt Hoyt, Untitled (Group 134 – Shared Axis), 2013-2015. Courtesy the artist and Art in General.
Photo: Charles Benton.

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Matt Hoyt, One Another (installation view), 2015. Courtesy the artist and Art in General.
Photo: Charles Benton.

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Matt Hoyt, Untitled (Group 136 – New Seeds), 2014-2015. Courtesy the artist and Art in General.
Photo: Charles Benton.

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Matt Hoyt, Untitled (Group135 – Bronze Rings), 2015. Courtesy the artist and Art in General.
Photo: Charles Benton.

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Matt Hoyt, One Another (installation view), 2015. Courtesy the artist and Art in General.
Photo: Charles Benton.

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Matt Hoyt, Untitled (Group 137 – Here to There), 2015. Courtesy the artist and Art in General.
Photo: Charles Benton.

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Matt Hoyt, Untitled (Group 133 – Together), 2013-2015. Courtesy the artist and Art in General.
Photo: Charles Benton.

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RELATED EVENTS

Mar 3, 2015–Apr 11, 2015
Exhibition
Matt Hoyt: One Another
Exhibition

Matt Hoyt: One Another

Matt Hoyt
Curated by Kristen Chappa
Exhibition: March 3–April 11, 2015
Opening reception: Tuesday, March 3, 6–8pm

Press Release: Download PDF

PRESS
Matt Hoyt at Art in General, by Iona Whittaker, FRIEZE Magazine Issue 127 (Summer 2015).
View online or download as PDF.

EXHIBITION
Art in General is pleased to present One Another with Matt Hoyt in the Musée Minuscule.

Matt Hoyt’s signature groupings of sculptures speak to the intimacy of objects—how material can become charged when it is held, rubbed, or placed in proximity to the body over a period of time. Hoyt fashions his small sculptures over long durations, shaping and reshaping them to achieve subtle variations in contour, texture, and patina. The newly created pieces on view are scaled in relationship to the human hand, foregrounding the relationship to both the body of the artist and viewer. Meant for close encounter, the commissioned installation is intended for one audience member at a time.

Hoyt’s sculptures recall forms such as rocks, shells, bone, and driftwood, and his subtle use of color calls up associations like rust, skin, and the enamel of teeth. The boundary between what is pulled from the landscape and what is industrially produced collapses. Epoxy, polyurethane, wood fill, and other utilitarian materials meant for plumbing or underwater boat repair are denatured into poetic, otherworldly gestures. Seashore detritus, ceramic shards from an excavation, a tool with an unknown function: each object hints at the familiar yet they remain uncannily elusive. Hoyt’s pieces resist categorization, oscillating between what is recognizable and unrecognizable, imagined and literal, intuitive and calculated.

There is a diaristic seriality to Hoyt’s presentations—forms emerge and re-emerge, like a meandering thought process made tangible. Items are repeated, elaborated, halved, completed, turned-over. Space is folded, wrapped, and bisected; revealing internal layers of stratification. He combines and recombines carefully selected compositions on handmade shelf supports—the arranged groupings carry as much significance as the discrete pieces that comprise them. Hoyt’s practice attempts to speak to the space between thinking and doing—how practice and repetition can harden into form; how abstractions such as illusion and memory can galvanize into physical presence.

Matt Hoyt has exhibited work in the United States and abroad at institutions including White Columns, New York (2009); MOMA PS1 Contemporary Art Center, Long Island City (2010); and Coco Kunstverein, Vienna (2011). Hoyt was included in the 2012 Biennial at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and was recently awarded a grant from Foundation for Contemporary Arts (2013). He received his BFA from School of Visual Arts (2000). The artist currently lives and works in New York City.


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Art in General was founded in Lower Manhattan in 1981 and supports the production of new work by local and international artists primarily through its New Commissions Program and its International Collaborations program.  Art in General also produces an annual symposium What Now? on critical and timely issues in artistic and curatorial practice.

General Support of Art in General is provided by General Hardware Manufacturing Inc.; the Institute of Museum and Library Services; the Lambent Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; Ruth Ivor Foundation; The Greenwich Collection; Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation; Toby D. Lewis Donor Advised Fund of the Jewish Federation of Cleveland; the William Talbott Hillman Foundation; and by individuals. This program is also supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

The New Commissions Program is made possible by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts; Trust for Mutual Understanding; National Endowment for the Arts; and Jerome Foundation. Support has also been provided by Commissioners’ Circle leaders Jeffery Larsen and Joseph Bolduc; Commissioners’ Circle supporter Cher Lewis, and Commissioners’ Circle members Roya Khadjavi-Heidari, Mary Lapides, Richard Massey, Ron and Lucille Neeley, and Leslie Ruff.

Additional special support provided by ROOT Studios.





PRESS